Middle school book report brochure

Broadcast a book review over the schools PA system. Research and tell a brief biography about the author. Make models of things read about in the book. Make a colorful mural depicting the book. A picture or caption about laughter for humorous books. Compare one book with a similar book.

Think of a new adventure for the main character. Write a script for an interview with the main character. Retell the story to a younger grade.

Choral reading with poetry. Adding original stanzas to poetry.

Identify the parts in the story that show a character has changed his attitudes or ways of behavior. Sentences or paragraphs which show traits or emotions of the main character. Parts of the story which compare the actions of two or more characters. A part that describes a person, place or thing. A part of the story that you think could not have really happened. A part that proves a personal opinion that you hold. A part which you believe is the climax of the story.

The conversation between two characters. Pretend you are the main character and retell the story. Work with a small group of students. Plan for one to read orally while the others pantomime the action. Write a letter to one of the characters.

Write a biographical sketch of one character. Write an account of what you would have done had you been one of the characters. Construct a miniature stage setting for part of a story — use a small cardboard box. Children enjoy preparing a monologue from a story. Marking particularly descriptive passages for oral reading gives the reader and his audience an opportunity to appreciate excellent writing, and gives them a chance to improve their imagery and enlarge their vocabulary.

The child who likes to make lists of new unusual and interesting words and expressions to add to his vocabulary might share such a list with others, using them in the context of the story. Giving a synopsis of a story is an excellent way of gaining experience in arranging events in sequences and learning how a story progresses to a climax. Using information in a book to make a scrapbook about the subject. A puppet show planned to illustrate the story. Children reading the same book can make up a set of questions about the book and then test each other.

Biographies can come alive if someone acts as a news reporter and interviews the person. Preparing a book review to present to a class at a lower level is an excellent experience in story- telling and gives children an understanding of how real authors must work to prepare books for children.

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Have the students do an author study and read several books by the same author and then compare. Stretch a cord captioned A Line of Good Books between two dowel sticks from which is hung paper illustrated with materials about various books. Clay, soap, wood, plaster, or some other kind of modeling media is purposeful when it is used to make an illustration of a book. Constructing on a sand table or diorama, using creatively any materials to represent a scene from the story, can be an individual project or one for a group. A bulletin board with a caption about laughter or a picture of someone laughing at excerpts from funny stories rewritten by the children from material in humorous books.

Video tape oral book reports and then have the children take turns taking the video home for all to share. Be Book Report Pen Pals and share book reports with children in another school. Do a costumed presentation of your book. Dress either as the author or one of the characters. Write a letter from one character to another character. Write the first paragraph or two for a sequel.

Outline what would happen in the rest of book. Write a new conclusion. Write a new beginning. If a journey was involved, draw a map with explanatory notes of significant places. Make a diorama and explain what it shows. Make a diorama showing the setting or a main event from the book. Make a new jacket with an original blurb. Use e-mail to tell a reading pen pal about the book.

Participate with three or four classmates in a television talk show about the book. With another student, do a pretend interview with the author or with one of the characters. Cut out magazine pictures to make a collage or a poster illustrating the idea of the book. Lead a small group discussion with other readers of the same book. Keep a reading journal and record your thoughts at the end of each period of reading. Write a book review for a class publication.

Find a song or a poem that relates to the theme of your book.

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Explain the similarities. For fun, exaggerate either characteristics or events and write a tabloid-style news story related to your book. Draw a comic-book page complete with bubble-style conversations showing an incident in your book. Use a journalistic style and write a news story about something that happened to one of the characters. Write a paragraph telling about the title. Is it appropriate? Why not? Decide on an alternate title for the book. Why is it appropriate? Is it better than the one the book has now? Why or Why not? Make a poster advertising your book.

Make a travel brochure inviting tourists to visit the setting of the book. What types of activities would there be for them to attend? Write a letter to the main character of the book. Write the letter he or she sends back. Make three or more puppets of the characters in the book. Prepare a short puppet show to tell the story to the class.

More Ideas Than You’ll Ever Use for Book Reports – actreatadroltoa.cf

Write a description of one of the main characters. Draw or cut out a picture to accompany the description. Make an ID card which belongs to one of the characters. Be sure to make the card look like the cards for that particular state. Include a picture and all information found on and ID card. Must include some "thought" questions. Rewrite the story as a picture book.